In July 2014, working as part of a team surveying plants above the Alpine Garden on New Hampshire’s Mount Washington, I came across many interesting native flora: arctic lichens, elfin tundra clubmoss, even a rare white-flowered rhododendron. The most remarkable find, though, was a distinctly unpleasant surprise: a patch of non-native dandelions blooming high on the…

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Time to celebrate the amazing alpine flowers! During the first weeks in June, the highest mountaintops in New England and New York finally begin to bloom. AMC leads several tours above treeline on the Presidential Range to see the floral display. The group shown here braved rain, sleet, and 50 mph winds to visit the Alpine…

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[Editor’s Note – this post was published on April 1st, so please keep this in mind as you’re reading along.] To the delight of many North Country birders, a centuries-old mystery may be on the verge of being solved. The ivory-billed snipe, or “IBS”, was first reported by Manasseh Cutler in 1785 on Mount Washington….

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With Spring only weeks away, red maple buds are poised to burst into flower.         If you’ve never had a chance to greet these early bloomers at eye level, prepare for a welcome blast of winter-busting color. Red maple flowers are spectacular, and they come by the bazillion.     Some trees…

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» CLICK PHOTO ABOVE TO LAUNCH SLIDESHOW Hoof prints in the mud, scat beside the trail, hoots and howls from deep in the woods. Signs of wildlife are so intriguing, they leave us wishing we could see more of the actual animals that share our world. Wild creatures prefer—wisely—to avoid us, and since many are…

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Intrepid skiers aren’t the only ones gliding through Pinkham Notch this month. As this photo shows, river otters take advantage of the slippery winter conditions to body surf through White Mountain woods and waterways.     Their thick, sleek coats and their hydrodynamic shapes make sliding the easy way to go—on mud, sand, grass, leaves,…

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A walk in the woods rewards us with glimpses of forest animals—a scampering chipmunk, a prowling toad, a trailside salamander. But sightings of lesser-known creatures are, by definition, rare. Many woodland animals are not active during the daylight, and most are shy about contact with humans. Typical hikers move with enough stomp and clomp to…

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Thousands of years have passed since retreating glaciers and shifting rivers scarred our landscape. In many spots in the Northeast, evidence of these ancient events can now be seen in the form of bogs. Their sphagnum moss mats—and the decaying peat beneath—create a unique habitat, complete with bright flowers and carnivorous plants. Visitors should stick…

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