Features Archives - Page 9 of 11 - Appalachian Mountain Club

Features

Three large black walnut trees stand in a perfect line, parallel to the side of a home in Wenham, Mass. An old rope swing dangles from a lofty branch. The owner says her kids sometimes bounce on the swing to dislodge walnuts from high above. Hundreds of the nuts litter the lawn. Russ Cohen kicks…

Read More....

A cockeyed old post holding a series of signs marks a junction 1.8 miles onto the Great Gulf Trail in New Hampshire’s White Mountain National Forest. The top sign, a slab of bare wood, has text carved deep into its surface: “Entering Great Gulf Wilderness.” To the west lie 5,500 acres of federal Wilderness—the first…

Read More....

I took my daughter on her first hike before she was 6 weeks old. My husband, Jim, and I picked the shortest route to the summit of Mount Cardigan, the West Ridge Trail, which winds a mile and a half up through forest to sloping granite ledges and a view that sweeps across New Hampshire’s…

Read More....

Within half a minute of beginning my first rock climb in years the best thing happens: I fall. I am just starting up the route called California Carpool (“as in everyone drives their own,” someone says). A bulge near the bottom arguably has what climbers would call this route’s crux, or hardest part, if only…

Read More....

Just outside of Boston, the Minuteman Commuter Bikeway runs 10 miles from the quiet suburban town of Bedford to the bustling edge of Cambridge. I ride the length of this paved rail-trail nearly every weekday to work and back again—more than 6,000 miles to date, and counting. Beneath shady woods, alongside tranquil meadows, past landmarks…

Read More....

Like many hikers, I spend a great deal of time staring at maps and dreaming of the possibilities of adventure and escape they evoke. For several years now, I have come back to maps of the Susquehannock Trail System (STS) in north-central Pennsylvania—and not just because I hiked the trail system for my new book,…

Read More....

Good judgment and thoughtful decision-making are critical components of effective leadership. But in the outdoors, a leader also has to cope with physiological, psychological, and environmental factors that can greatly affect the outcome of a situation. When crisis looms, weighing risks versus benefits can be a helpful guide to problem solving. Here are a couple…

Read More....

We had the island to ourselves: 2 acres of spruce forest surrounded by a wonderland of curving, polished granite ledge that dropped into the sea. The kayaks rested above the beach, beyond the reach of the tide, and we’d pitched our tents—each of our two families in a campsite of its own—beneath the canopy of…

Read More....

Paul is in trouble. Midway into our ascent of the Valley Way Trail in New Hampshire’s Northern Presidential Range, his pace slows considerably. His face, sweat-soaked and somber, maps the struggle within. He’s an experienced hiker, but the burdens of a 40-pound backpack and weary, 66-year-old thighs are conspiring against him. Nonetheless determined, he leans…

Read More....

This year’s record number of entries—more than 800 photos—covered many themes that have become classics in the AMC Photo Contest: huts and hiking dogs, blooming wildflowers and birds in flight, ravines and ridgelines, sunrises and starry skies. Our judges, as you’ll see on the coming pages, rewarded creative twists on these classics: a dog’s reflection,…

Read More....