From the Magazine Archives - Page 28 of 31 - Appalachian Mountain Club

From the Magazine

One of the biggest drawbacks of smartphones is their limited battery life. To keep them running longer in the backcountry, consider the following:  Don’t leave GPS-powered apps running. Even with the screen off, these apps are still constantly tracking your location—and rapidly draining your batteries.  Turn off wi-fi and set your phone to airplane mode…

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COVER PHOTO: RYAN SMITH AMC OUTDOORS MAGAZINE MARCH/APRIL 2014 TABLE OF CONTENTS FEATURES Learning to Lead: Inside AMC’s Mountain Leadership School Sea Kayaking Down East: Exploring the Maine Island Trail, Family-Style Browse all features VIEW FROM AMC Outdoor Recreation Fuels the Economy Browse all View from AMC VISTAS (NOW “CURRENTS”) Bugging Out: Threats from Ticks…

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We had the island to ourselves: 2 acres of spruce forest surrounded by a wonderland of curving, polished granite ledge that dropped into the sea. The kayaks rested above the beach, beyond the reach of the tide, and we’d pitched our tents—each of our two families in a campsite of its own—beneath the canopy of…

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Don’t overlayer. You generate substantial body heat even in the coldest and windiest conditions, especially if you’re powering up a mountainside.  Leash your mittens or gloves to your wrists to prevent strong winds from blasting away these critical items. Secure loose straps on the outside of your pack or clothing to prevent them from flapping wildly in the…

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You can easily burn 4,000 calories a day or more on a cold-weather adventure, which makes it crucial to consume sufficient high-energy food for body heat and go-power. Carbohydrates, especially simple sugars, provide the fastest energy and should be your primary source of daytime calories. Energy bars and candy bars turn into rock-hard bricks in…

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The number one mistake made by novice cross-country skiers: overlayering. You generate a lot of body heat as you ski. Here’s what to wear for cross-country skiing. A warm base layer is sufficient to keep you comfortable in all but the most arctic conditions.  Heat-stealing wind is a major concern. Wear a lightweight, wind-resistant top and…

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The snowpack can be tricky and uneven. Hidden soft spots and hard objects lurk within. Use poles to enhance your balance—and to assist your recovery in the event of a tumble. Upgrade three-season trekking poles for winter use by swapping in a pair of winter baskets to prevent the tips from sinking into the snow. Note…

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COVER PHOTO: BRIAN POST AMC OUTDOORS MAGAZINE JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2014 TABLE OF CONTENTS FEATURES Tranquil Trails: Easy Spots for Cross-Country Skiing in New England One of the Team: Dogsledding in the Maine Woods Browse all features VIEW FROM AMC Energy That’s Not So Cheap Browse all View from AMC VISTAS (NOW “CURRENTS”) Cities Gone Wild: U.S….

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You don’t have to be a hard-core mountaineer to enjoy breathtaking views from the Northeast’s mountains, as they come in all sizes. In the shadow of famous peaks such as Washington, Katahdin, and Greylock are lower summits with outstanding views of their better-known neighbors. These little mountains offer relatively short and less-traveled trails that are…

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Federal and state agencies have rules for hiking with dogs in backcountry areas. Here are the key ones to keep in mind in the Northeast, followed by some AMC-specific regulations: National Parks Dogs are not allowed on many hiking trails on National Park Service lands, and those that do allow them typically require dogs to…

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