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Appalachia Journal

This story appears in the Summer/Fall 2015 issue of Appalachia journal. Subscribe by July 14 to receive the entire issue. Climbers exploring the newly reopened cliffs of the New Jersey Highlands found ring and iron pitons from the 1930s or 1940s. If those rusty pitons could talk… Nine years ago, when New Jersey authorities started granting…

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This story appears in the Winter/Spring 2015 issue of Appalachia journal. Subscribe by Jan. 10 to receive the entire issue. The stark reality of death, that half dreaded, half invited angel ever brooding in the shadows of the climber’s world.—Guy Waterman, A Fine Kind of Madness Backs to the encircling headwall, we listen as the…

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Trail Running Hits the White Mountains I am running up Wildcat Mountain’s Polecat Trail . It’s a beautiful fall afternoon, midweek, and it’s just me, my dog Samivel, and the mountain. My pulse, my breathing, all settle into a familiar groove. As I move upward, I shed the day’s trivialities. My mind wanders. I am…

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An interview with Peter Landres Appalachia, Summer/Fall 2014 In honor of the 50th anniversary of the federal Wilderness Act, Appalachia caught up with Peter Landres, an ecologist with the federal Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute in Missoula, Montana. Peter Landres is an ecologist with the federal Aldo Leopold Wilderness Research Institute in Missoula, Montana. The…

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Many animals are becoming increasingly nocturnal in an effort to avoid humans. Appalachia, Winter/Spring 2014 Nighttime is a simpler, wilder time. It’s an opportunity to experience the world in a fresh way. Washington writer Dawn Stover documents the ways biologists and volunteers are observing the ways animals deal with human encroachment. Many have responded by…

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The first in California since 1924. Appalachia, Winter/Spring 2014 In the vast expanse of the Modoc Plateau in northern California live bald eagles, black bears, mountain lions, and—for 15 magical months—the first gray wolf to roam California in nearly 90 years. He was named OR7 because he was the seventh wolf affixed with a global…

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Norway’s fugitive mountain woman Appalachia, Winter/Spring 2014 Everyone on Malangen knows the story: In March 1733, Birte Olsdatter murdered her husband, the troll-man. Birte was a beautiful girl from the next fjord over, forced to marry Jens Olsen, who was twice her age and beat her. She escaped home to her family, but they insisted…

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A dying mother tells her daughter, “The woods were calling you.” Appalachia, Winter/Spring 2014 One winter evening, a number of years ago, when I was a daughter home for the holidays from graduate school, my mother sent me out to get the newspaper from the end of the driveway. We had forgotten to pick it…

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An ode to the carpenters of the Madison Spring Hut Appalachia, Summer/Fall 2013 Since 1888, some sort of shelter has sat in the col between Mounts Madison and John Quincy Adams, just below the lip of land that holds Star Lake. Stone and timber huts have risen and fallen numerous times in this place, the…

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Hidden damages below Prince William Sound Appalachia, Summer/Fall 2013 My whole body trembled as the shadows darkened over our campsite beside Shoup Glacier near Valdez, Alaska. Sea kayaking in the rain on a 40-degree day on 35-degree water induced the chill. As night closed in, the wind picked up, and the rain came in horizontal…

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