Appalachia Journal Archives - Page 3 of 7 - Appalachian Mountain Club

Appalachia Journal

Do large trees grow large trout? Appalachia, Summer/Fall 2013 July 9, 2012: Thoreau Falls. On a hot day in mid-July last summer, the patter of rain on my trekking umbrella puts me to sleep in the Pemigewasset Wilderness. Are monsoons, thanks to global warming, coming to northern New England? This is day two of a…

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What a transmission line would look like in Delaware Water Gap. The price of transporting power through the Northeast Appalachia, Summer/Fall 2013 Northbounders on the Appalachian Trail most often reach the majestic Delaware Water Gap on the Pennsylvania and New Jersey border by May or June. Having traveled some 1,285 miles from Springer Mountain in…

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A modern woman rambles through a season with Thoreau Appalachia, Winter/Spring 2013 I have met with but one or two persons in the course of my life who understood the art of Walking, that is, of taking walks, who had a genius, so to speak, for sauntering; which word is beautifully derived “from idle people…

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Traditional meets modern at Gorman Chairback Lodge and Cabins Appalachia, Summer/Fall 2012 We don’t know what drew William P. Dean to the rugged Maine forests in 1867. Perhaps the one-armed Civil War veteran sought relief in the woods, exhausted by a brutal war. With  the loss of his arm, employment must have been difficult to…

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Appalachia Summer/Fall 2011 On the eleventh evening of a mountain walk taken during the ninth month in 2008, I call home. Nothing unusual there, you might say, but the act of calling is the only usual part of what follows. As I punch in the number, listen to the ringing, and wait for my wife…

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Appalachia Summer/Fall 2011 I love the old climbing routes of the 1920s and 1930s. In part, this is because I like climbing the big features in a landscape—prominent cliffs, ridges, and mountains—and because I don’t tend to climb very difficult grades, at least from the modern perspective. But it’s also because I enjoy being a…

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Appalachia Summer/Fall 2011 “What territory do you cover?” “A place called New Jersey. And I would like to be transferred.” —Here Comes Mr. Jordan, 1941 filmI arrived in 1966—and am still awaiting transfer. New Jersey is an odd state: raucous, crowded, not given to reflection. Jersey folk talk tough and keep tenderness or friendliness for…

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Appalachia Summer/Fall 2011 New Jersey is —let ’s face it —famous for its turnpike . And its parkways, industry, and congestion. Cut through the stereotype and myths and here’s a fact: The percentage of New Jersey’s land remaining as natural open space outranks that of 25 other U.S. states, including Colorado, Arizona, Wisconsin, Hawaii, and…

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Appalachia, Winter/Spring 2011 I am walking through Zealand Notch, south toward Thoreau Falls. It’s a gray late November day, well after the kaleidoscope has departed the hillsides. Winter’s onset sits heavy in silent, bare birch boughs all around me, like a wordless warning. It’s easy to slip into a sweet sort of melancholy if one…

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Appalachia, Winter/Spring 2011 Craig Lombard owns 1,000 acres of land in Berlin, New Hampshire. The parcel is relatively unremarkable: slopes of woodlot crisscrossed by logging roads and wildlife paths, abutting the summit of Mount Forist on one end and Jericho Mountain State Park on the other. For years, the parcel remained woodlot, accessed for timber…

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