2006 Archives - Page 2 of 4 - Appalachian Mountain Club

2006

You are stranded, injured and alone. Night is falling, conditions are deteriorating, and there is no way out until the next day. Or longer. Are you equipped to survive? Your chances will be vastly improved if you carry these essential items and know how to use them. STAY DRY AND WARM Hypothermia will kill you…

Read More....

Hike Along Cliffs

November 1, 2006

Dance with vertigo atop the Northeast’s most impressive cliffs. Or crane your neck stiff staring skyward from below. Cragged by jags, dusted by snowfall, these seven vertical landmarks heighten any Northeast outdoor experience. Most are easily accessible, but all of them require caution, especially for a late fall visit. Always prepare for full winter conditions…

Read More....

Sure, headlamps make you look like some sort of cyclopean beambrain. But it’s a small price to pay for the convenience of hands-free lighting, whether in camp, on the trail, or in the depths of your gear closet. Headlamp design has made a quantum leap in recent years, incorporating bulbs and battery-sipping LEDs into an…

Read More....

The most emblematic and colorful tree in the Northeast, the sugar maple torches the autumn woods. They appear throughout the region, but grow only at lower elevations and prefer enriched soils uncommon in an often acidic landscape. And only in the most special places do they dominate the forest to create prismatic cathedrals. Here are…

Read More....

Since 1968, AMC’s Youth Opportunities Program has introduced more than 58,000 young people to the outdoors through its unique brand of experiential education. The program provides inner-city youth workers with valuable outdoor leadership training in areas ranging from backpacking and camping to gear and navigation. In this photo, YOP participants learn team building during a…

Read More....

For many of us, heading into the backcountry for a multi-day trip means that we’re carrying more than just a loaded backpack. The monkey of caffeine addiction rides along as well, and you’ve got to feed it or face the logy, headpounding consequences. And, hey, coffee tastes good anyway. So what’s the best way to…

Read More....

The final miles of the Appalachian Trail weave through a wild landscape flush with the diversity of northern Maine. Here, along the longest stretch of trail that doesn’t cross a paved road, intrepid hikers can visit sluicing rivers, sheening lakes, monster trees, and airy viewpoints. Two nearby mountains await as well, surveying the entire region. But be aware:…

Read More....

A sign of the times. AMC began work on the Mahoosuc Trail in 1918, completing the southern-most section in 1925. AMC celebrated its 100th anniversary by building the Centennial Trail from Gorham to Mount Hayes in 1976. This image is a scan of a lantern slide, a positive transparency imprinted onto a card-sized glass plate….

Read More....

A long-distance journey by bicycle slows the hyperactive human experience, allowing you time to investigate the places and cultures that surround you. It demands a certain level of fitness, but keeps you active, energized, and refreshingly alive. And when planned well, a multi-day bicycle trip even provides a good deal of leisure time. So what’s…

Read More....

Moose Hill Wildlife Sanctuary, Sharon, Mass.: Massachusetts Audubon’s oldest sanctuary, 1,984-acre Moose Hill features 25 miles of trails winding through a diverse world of rocky bluffs, ferny wetlands, and meadows darting with birdlife. Scan the landscape from a tower atop 534-foot Moose Hill, mosey over boardwalks in a red maple swamp, or clamber atop the…

Read More....