2006 Archives - Page 3 of 4 - Appalachian Mountain Club

2006

Love the beach but hate crowds, traffic, and the oiled masses? In the Northeast, summer mania regularly inundates coastal destinations with sand-loving hordes, making it difficult to quietly commune with the sea. Consider opting instead for these peaceful strands, which offer long stretches of lesser-traveled oceanfront for hiking, exploring, and simply soaking it all in….

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In 1946, the U.S. Army created N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide. Commonly known as DEET, it is the most widely used insect repellent in the world today. It’s also caustic enough to melt plastic, a concern for many outdoor enthusiasts who regularly slather it on their skin. A variety of alternatives are available, including several natural compounds, but how…

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For years, hikers only had three real options when it came to treating water in the backcountry: boil it, filter it, or add iodine. Now a broad array of weaponry is available to exterminate all the aquatic baddies looking to take up residence in your gut: bacteria, viruses, cryptosporidia, and especially parasitic enemy number one,…

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May is the best month of the year for wildflowers in the Northeast. As forests awaken from their winter slumber, the ground explodes with spring ephemerals blooming in the brief sunny window before the trees leaf out and seal the woods in deep shade. Explore these choice destinations to see them in their greatest riots,…

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If you were on the trail for hundreds of days and thousands of miles, what would be your most cherished piece of gear? To help answer this question of packing priorities, we queried dozens of AT thru-hikers for their hard-won thoughts on the matter. Some answers you’d expect. Others may surprise you. Light is right…

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The Appalachian Trail travels through the Northeast for 1,166 miles, from Harpers Ferry, W. Va., to the summit of Katahdin, in Maine. Along the way, it journeys through profound natural diversity, pauses at mind-bending views, and spans the breadth of Northeast hiking experiences. You may never hike the entire AT, but you can still revel…

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Roughly hewn paddles slide silently through the water. Deer graze on the banks, unaware of approaching danger. Two slender, tanned youths with long, raven hair stay low in the handsomely crafted canoe, letting the boat glide into the reeds along the edges of Maine’s Moose River. They reach for their flint arrows and creep towards…

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AMC Outdoors, March 2006 The Trip: A wildlife-filled paddle on Lake Memphremagog’s South Bay Length and Intensity: Easy to moderate Best Time To Go: Spring At the northern end of Lake Memphremagog (Abenaki for “beautiful waters”), in the city of Newport, Vt., South Bay feels almost urban. You can hear sirens, trucks, heavy equipment, and…

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by Jeff Moag GETTING STARTED in whitewater paddling is surprisingly easy, and the Northeast has fabulous rivers for beginners as well as expert creekboaters. An introductory course will equip you with the skills you need to tackle Class II whitewater, including all the basic strokes and the Eskimo roll. Classes are also an excellent place…

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AMC Outdoors, March 2006 The first time you get into a canoe, it’s like the beginning of a love affair. Everything is exciting and new. You can’t get enough time together. All you want is to be alone on the water with your floating friend. But after a while the novelty begins to wear. You…

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