2008 Archives - Page 2 of 4 - Appalachian Mountain Club

2008

Learn about the tools professional and volunteer trail crews use by trying to match the image with the clue. The answers are at the bottom of the page. A One of the world’s oldest tools, this implement comes in different sizes, which can be selected based upon the preference of its user. Older, handmade versions…

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It’s ironic that outdoor enthusiasts—a generally eco-conscious bunch—clothe and outfit themselves extensively with petroleum-based products like polyester and nylon. The reason is simple. Compared to natural alternatives, the advantages of synthetic materials—lightweight, fast-drying, durable—are usually more desirable, at least when it comes to outdoor activities. So how can you reduce your gear’s carbon footprint without…

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A tree’s loss is a hiker’s gain. The transition of a leaf’s green color to an array of vibrant hues signifies its impending demise. As summer turns to fall, sunlight begins to diminish, which triggers a slowing down—and eventual halting—of a leaf’s chlorophyll production (the process that gives leaves their green shade). Pigments once masked…

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A knife is considered one of the 10 essentials, a critical piece of outdoor gear for safety, convenience, and whittling your marshmallow stick. There is a vast universe of knife styles and models out there, however, ranging in price from $25 to $100 and beyond. So how do you hone in on the right edge?…

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Do you have what it takes to become an outdoor detective? Some animals brave winter atop a blanket of snow—and leave behind roadmaps to where they’ve headed and clues to what they’ve been doing. It’s up to you to decipher the signs and piece together their story. According to AMC Senior Interpretive Naturalist Nicky Pizzo,…

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On the first day of a glacial ski traverse I did recently in Alaska’s Chugach Range, I forgot to turn on my avalanche beacon. I should have known better. Last March, I took the National Ski Patrol’s (NSP) Level I Avalanche course at AMC’s Joe Dodge Lodge in Pinkham Notch. Taught by NSP-certified instructors who…

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Once your socks get soaking wet, your boots start churning up an unpleasant cocktail of squishy feet, cold toes, and mushy blisters. A good pair of gaiters helps protect you from this soggy fate by keeping snow, muck, and wet from getting into your boots in the first place. They can also save your feet…

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Try Winter Hiking

December 1, 2008

In the new AMC Guide to Winter Hiking and Camping, authors Yemaya Maurer and Lucas St. Clair recommend you start winter hiking on trails that are close to home or familiar to you. They also advocate keeping the mileage and elevation modest. Short day hikes (no more than 3 miles) will help you adapt to…

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On January 26, 1906, 10 AMC members departed the Mount Madison House, an inn in Gorham, N.H., to climb Mount Madison. The first recorded winter summit of the peak had been achieved only 17 years earlier by Rosewell Lawrence and Laban Watson. Two from the 1906 party ascended via the Durand Ridge while the remaining…

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In 1964, the U.S. Congress permanently protected some of the last wild places in America, as well as lands once tamed by human industry. The Wilderness Act established a National Wilderness Preservation System that now includes 704 areas in the U.S. The lands, unmarred by roads and left largely to nature’s whims, are places to…

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