January/February 2014 Archives - Page 3 of 4 - Appalachian Mountain Club

January/February 2014

This year’s record number of entries—more than 800 photos—covered many themes that have become classics in the AMC Photo Contest: huts and hiking dogs, blooming wildflowers and birds in flight, ravines and ridgelines, sunrises and starry skies. Our judges, as you’ll see on the coming pages, rewarded creative twists on these classics: a dog’s reflection,…

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Join guide Stephen Madera of Song in the Woods and his four-legged team on a dogsledding journey in the Maine Woods. Read more about dogsledding in One of the Team and browse all AMC videos on YouTube.  

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Swish, swish. Swish, swish. Our skis whisked across the glossy white surface of a field at Dolly Copp campground in New Hampshire’s White Mountain National Forest. On this chilly, early spring morning, the campground was otherwise silent and empty. I followed two old friends, Brian and Val, eastward across the snow. In the distance lay…

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Recent natural gas prices have hit all-time lows, because underground supplies have become more accessible through a process known as hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. While that fuel burns relatively cleanly and is less expensive than other energy sources, gas extracted by fracking carries with it other costs that make this energy anything but cheap. Fracking…

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In December 1942, Appalachia published an article extolling the virtues of sled dogs—their strength, intelligence, and loyalty. The writer described a dog repeatedly nudging him awake as he lay exhausted in the snow near his sputtering fire while the sun slipped below the horizon. “I have learned to trust some dogs absolutely,” the author wrote….

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In winter, we often notice the signs of animals that are active on the snow’s surface, such as tracks left behind by a deer or fox. But another set of animals is active right beneath the snow, in the pockets of air between the snowpack and the ground. Small rodents like mice, moles, voles, and…

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I’m wary of big dogs, especially those that look like wolves. So when Stephen Madera asks me to help Teddy, a 50-pound Siberian husky, get down from the kennel on the back of his truck, I’m nervous. “He might like to use your shoulder,” Madera says. I hook a hand under Teddy’s collar and he…

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Snowshoeing for fun and exercise in the woods and fields close to home doesn’t require a lot of preparation or skills beyond the ability to put one foot in front of the other. But when your adventures take you farther afield into the more challenging terrain of the mountains, a few simple tips and techniques…

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Just as my brain is processing that my right hand needs to grab the knob above my head, it starts: the dreaded sewing-machine leg—that uncontrollable bobbing from leg fatigue. I get hold of the knob, but it seems to be harder to grip than I expected, and my forearm begins to burn. “Resting!” I call…

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Frigid temperatures and serious winds blast the Northeast’s highest peaks in winter. Frostbite can happen quickly on any exposed skin. For a winter summit attempt, you must be able to protect every square inch of your face, neck, and head. To accomplish this, you need four essential components: a liner balaclava, hat, face mask, and…

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