July/August 2014 Archives - Page 2 of 4 - Appalachian Mountain Club

July/August 2014

When it comes to keeping bugs at bay, there’s no question that DEET is an extremely effective repellent. But it’s not without its drawbacks—and one of them is DEET’s caustic ability to wreak havoc on plastics. And there are two common items of hiking gear that are particularly vulnerable to damage. 1) Sunglasses The vast…

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Leading kids through the woods requires more than a map and compass. You also need enthusiasm and creativity to keep things fun for young hikers, whether they’re preschoolers who tire easily or older children who claim they’re bored. Try these strategies to keep kids interested when out on the trail. ACTIVE PLAY Walk This Way:…

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It’s always good to know where you are. If you’re hiking on trails, here are the techniques I use to keep track of where I am at all times. Have the best trail map available Locate, purchase, and carry the most detailed, up-to-date, and accurate trail map for the area you’re visiting. Whenever possible, spend…

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Want to climb the highest peak in the Northeast the hard way? The Great Gulf Trail follows the West Branch of the Peabody River through a Wilderness Area and then ascends New Hampshire’s iconic Mount Washington via an infamously precipitous headwall. The Great Gulf Trail begins at the Great Gulf Wilderness parking area on the…

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Tips and Tricks for Hiking with Kids Ask if they want to go on an “adventure” not a “hike.” Let them set the pace. No death marches! Take breaks based on kids’ needs and wants, not yours. Carry an arsenal of distractions: lots of games, lots of enticing snacks. Have a destination at hike’s end….

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It was at AMC’s Gorman Chairback Lodge, somewhere around 1:30 in the morning, when I overheard a visitor ask a friend with whom he was traveling, “Do we have butt cream?” It wasn’t all that unusual a query, really. You see, this duo was part of a European team competing in the 200-mile Untamed New…

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I recently wrote about the Ten Essentials, which includes quite a few extremely, ahem, essential items. But which is the least useful? From my perspective, it’s the one I’ve carried for more than 20 years and barely ever used: a compass. Why do you need a compass? A compass allows you to very quickly orient…

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Invest in waterproof, tear-proof trail maps. Tyvek and plastic are significantly more durable than paper. If you do carry a paper map, fold it to highlight your area and place it inside a waterproof map case or a heavy-duty resealable freezer bag. Always use a broad-spectrum sunscreen that protects against both sunburn-inducing UVA and skin-damaging…

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Two first-aid kits are spread on the hood of my friend’s car and we’re trying to decide what we should pull from each for our three-day hike along the Appalachian Trail from Connecticut into Massachusetts. Julia, my friend’s 7-year-old daughter, and I are looking at a rolled-up ACE bandage. “Do you think we’ll need that?”…

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The 10 Essentials are more than just a list. They are the basics of survival. Carry them and you will always be equipped for the unexpected. First developed in the 1930s by the Mountaineers, a Seattle-based nonprofit, the original 10 Essentials consisted of a list of specific items—knife, map, compass, matches, etc. Today, several different…

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