May/June 2014 Archives - Page 2 of 4 - Appalachian Mountain Club

May/June 2014

A heavy-duty garbage bag should be a core item of any survival kit. In a backcountry emergency or survival situation—especially in cold, rainy, and/or windy conditions—a garbage bag can quickly and easily be used as an outer layer for both protection and warmth. A 55-gallon contractor bag in action. To do so, cut a slit…

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Combine the joy of day hiking with the adventure of a night in a tent and you’ll see why backpacking is a terrific family adventure. These six overnight outings in New England and the Mid-Atlantic are recommended for young hikers by AMC authors. To learn more about these backpacking destinations, check out AMC’s Best Backpacking…

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Fill power indicates the volume of a given amount of down. Specifically, it measures how many cubic inches an ounce of down occupies under standard laboratory conditions. I often describe the world of outdoor company hype and catalog spin as 90 percent marketing and 10 percent science. When it comes to measuring and certifying the…

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There’s ultralight backpacking, and then there’s hyperlight. It’s possible for all your backpacking gear to weigh less than 10 pounds (excluding food, water, and the clothes you’re wearing) but accomplishing it requires some notable sacrifices and expense. Here’s what it takes to experience the lightest, rightest, fastest backpacking experience of your life. Shelter: 0 to…

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Rhode Island’s largest area open to mountain biking sits in between some of New England’s largest cities. The 14,000-acre Arcadia Management Area, tucked just off Interstate 95 near the Connecticut border, is less than 30 miles from Providence and can be reached from Boston, Hartford, and New Haven in less than two hours. Arcadia’s dense…

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Back when a dollar went a lot further than it does today, an overnight stay at AMC’s Carter Notch Hut would run you 75 cents. That was a century ago, and while the Consumer Price Index has since seen more hikes than a chapter trip leader, one could argue that the value of a visit…

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To lace hiking boots properly, begin at the front of your shoe by cinching the laces over the top of your foot (the instep) just enough to prevent the front of your foot from sliding side-to-side. Do not overtighten them or you will begin to compromise circulation.  Once you reach above the instep, where the top…

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Spring is the time of year when adult ticks that have overwintered underground emerge for one last attempt at a succulent blood feast. If you find one attached to yourself or your pet, I highly recommend using the Pro-Tick Remedy to remove the nasty little blood-sucker—it’s been my go-to tick removal device for years. This…

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In more than 90 percent of bicycle fatalities, the rider was not wearing a helmet. Don’t become part of this statistic! Make sure your bike helmet fit is optimized to your noggin. It should feel snug but not uncomfortably tight and sit level on your head. The front should rest no more than one inch above…

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Chafing on the hips is a common problem, especially with heavier loads and for hikers whose hips have little or no curvature to support a waist belt.  To minimize potential pressure points, wear pants or shorts with a smooth waistband.  For extra padding and waistbelt support, tie a fleece jacket evenly around your waist.  To help…

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