January/February 2015 Archives - Page 2 of 4 - Appalachian Mountain Club

January/February 2015

Untouched for hundreds of years, old-growth pine, hemlock, oak, and spruce trees reach for the sky. These forests, primeval woodlands rich in biodiversity, are rare gems in the Northeast. This winter, snowshoe back in time by exploring these ancient giants of the forest. Old-growth forests include trees never harvested for timber that are between 150…

Read More....

Can you dig it? Photo: Chewonki Semester School; Flickr A quinzee is a giant pile of snow that you then hollow out to create a shelter—essentially it’s a build-it-yourself snow cave. Knowing how to construct one is a useful winter survival skill, a fun activity to do with kids, and a potential use for the…

Read More....

This winter, instead of telling the kids to go outside and build a snowman or grab their gear for sledding, why not provide them with some new ideas? Yemaya St. Clair, co-author of the AMC Guide to Winter Hiking and Camping, says, “The beauty of winter is that many outdoor activities can be enjoyed only…

Read More....

With a new central office on the edge of Central Park, a beefed-up Youth Opportunities Program (YOP) including a well-stocked equipment room, and burgeoning partnerships with groups and agencies throughout New York City’s five boroughs, AMC is building its presence in the Big Apple. A new central office at the West Side YMCA is home…

Read More....

Coffee is good. Brain-splitting headaches are bad. If you’re a backpacking caffeine addict like me—or you simply enjoy the occasional backcountry brew—you’ll need the tools to produce a cup or three of this headache-staving, performance-enhancing, deliciously stimulating beverage. Here are your backcountry coffee options, rated for weight, quality of brew, and convenience. Instant opportunities It’s…

Read More....

Most disposable hand warmers provide several hours of quality heat, but what if you only need warmth for a limited time? Don’t waste perfectly good heat by throwing out a hand warmer after only a short use! Save it for when you need it with this über-simple technique. Use the heat when you need it….

Read More....

One of the biggest challenges of winter cycling is keeping your fingers from becoming icy popsicles of pain. Over a decade of winter bike commuting, I’ve tried multiple solutions—a whole universe of gloves, lobster claws, and mittens—and to date the best, warmest option I’ve found are Bar Mitts. Constructed from thick 5.5mm neoprene, Bar Mitts…

Read More....

Photograph by iStock. Dirt, sweat, and body grime cause goose down to clump together, reducing the puffiness and warmth of your down gear. So puff it back up with the following tips on how to clean down jackets and sleeping bags: Handwash in the bathtub using a mild powdered detergent or down-specific cleaner (available from…

Read More....

Photograph by Jerry and Marcy Monkman. A few simple tricks can eliminate many small inconveniences of winter hiking. Designate specific jacket pockets for your hat and gloves so you can easily keep track of them. Keep an energy bar in a pocket close to your body to avoid breaking your teeth on a frozen, rock-hard…

Read More....

When winter arrives in the Northeast, the familiar world is transformed. Animals vanish, either migrating or hibernating. Frost forms delicate patterns on your windows. Temperatures drop and days get shorter. These seasonal changes create countless learning opportunities. Teach your children about winter with a few simple science projects. 1) Make instant snow. The concept is…

Read More....