July/August 2015 Archives - Page 3 of 3 - Appalachian Mountain Club

July/August 2015

We’ve all done it: felt that first inkling of discomfort—a growing warmth on our heel or at the base of our toes—and kept right on hiking. “It’s nothing,” we tell ourselves. “It won’t get much worse.” Distracted by the trail ahead and the promise of future vistas, we trek on, ignoring our tender skin until…

Read More....

The way water striders skim across the surface of ponds has earned them the nickname “Jesus bugs.” But this seemingly miraculous ability—a signature of the mostly freshwater-dwelling Gerridae family of insects—has a perfectly natural explanation. POSITIVE TENSION Surface tension helps make the water strider’s leaps and glides possible. Water molecules are attracted to each other…

Read More....

Hot food. Hot drinks. Hot coffee. Yum. To enjoy any of these in the backcountry, you’re going to need a stove, of which there are three fundamental types: canister, alcohol, and liquid fuel. Which one is right for you? Your backpacking style and needs will help you decide. CANISTER STOVES A solid choice for most…

Read More....

Paddling to an island offers the best of two worlds: the waterborne access of a canoe or kayak and the unfettered freedom of a hike. Islands can provide a remote picnic spot, a chance to stretch your legs or nap in the sun, and a temporary escape from the bustle of the mainland. Lucky for…

Read More....

Fat-tire bikes (or fat bikes, for short) really catch the eye. Their bulbous tires, upwards of 4 inches wide, seem to belong on a very different vehicle—a moon rover, perhaps, but definitely not an otherwise normal-looking mountain bike frame. Yet these bikes have exploded in popularity over the past few years, creating year-round, all-terrain riding…

Read More....

At a mere 2,061 feet, Third Mountain hardly commands attention as one of Maine’s lofty massifs. In fact, it ranks 352nd among the state’s notable peaks. And that’s just fine with me. What Third Mountain lacks in altitude, it more than makes up for in quietude. From Monument Cliff, an inviting granite perch on its…

Read More....

Early 19th century hikers didn’t have much specialized gear. They wore cotton and wool and leather. But hiding in plain sight in many AMC photographs from the era is a trailblazing item: a tin AMC cup, often seen dangling from backpacks or hanging by their wire handles from belts. An ad in the back of…

Read More....

According to the New England Wild Flower Society (NEWFS), native plant species are disappearing at an alarming rate. In a report released this spring, researchers detail the trend—and what can be done to halt it. One easy measure is to make space for native plants in your own yard. Daniel Jaffe of NEWFS recommends starting…

Read More....

We asked Mike Lynch, a lifelong paddler and the author of Canoe Camping with Kids: An Overnight Adventure on the Northern Forest Canoe Trail, for the key guidelines every first-time canoe camper should follow—especially parents heading out on the water with kids. For more tips on introducing your children to canoeing and kayaking, check out…

Read More....

Sara DeLucia, AMC’s Highland Center program manager, points out wildflowers along the Around-the-Lake Trail, an easy 1.2-mile walking path that circles Ammonoosuc Lake on the grounds of the Highland Center, in New Hampshire’s Crawford Notch. Watch more videos from the Nature Walk series and browse all AMC videos on YouTube.  

Read More....