March/April 2016 Archives - Page 2 of 3 - Appalachian Mountain Club

March/April 2016

In AMC’s early years of trail work, members concentrated on building new trails in the White Mountains. The organization oversaw the construction of iconic routes through King Ravine, the Great Gulf, and Tuckerman Ravine, along with many other trails that remain in use today. But as trail mileage grew, so did the need for regular maintenance. At first, AMC hired local woodsmen to occasionally clear trails. Then, in…

Read More....

From time to time, many of us find ourselves taking a step back and admiring the handiwork of our fellow lovers of the outdoors—those volunteers who devote time and elbow grease to trail work. We can think about it a bit differently, too, considering not just what we do for the trails, but what trail…

Read More....

Every spring, Doug Blodgett, a biologist for Vermont Fish and Wildlife, laces up his sturdy boots and goes out to count rattlesnakes. It’s hard work, as they’re masters of camouflage. “You don’t see them until, literally, you’re a foot or two away,” he says. “It’s never boring.” Blodgett’s yearly count is part of an effort…

Read More....

In July, AMC’s Echo Lake Camp will open for its 91st year, a stone’s throw from Acadia National Park on Maine’s Mount Desert Island. Campers can expect many familiar staples, including lobster cookouts, square dances, and talent night, but there will be one big change. After 35 years, longtime managers Ned and Mary Mitchell will…

Read More....

A row of trees fills the median bisecting Delancey Street, where the Williamsburg Bridge spills into Manhattan’s Lower East Side. For now, those trees are the only plant life in sight, but a local group has begun testing an idea that could put this intersection at the forefront of urban green space—as home to the…

Read More....

Visitors to AMC’s Joe Dodge Lodge and Pinkham Notch Visitor Center in New Hampshire will have a unique opportunity to see trail work up close this summer. AMC’s professional trail crew is set to construct an elevated boardwalk, featuring an accessible design to accommodate users of various physical abilities, at the Lost Pond trailhead, just…

Read More....

The spring peeper, a frog species, is named for its most distinctive feature: a high-pitched mating call that is inextricably tied to the end of winter—and that’s very loud. “To hear hundreds and hundreds of males making that sound, if you’re camping in a tent or shelter, or if you have a pond near your…

Read More....

In the event of a backcountry emergency—such as a debilitating injury, unexpected night out, or severe weather event—a simple lightweight tarp can provide crucial protection from the elements, if you know how to use it. Covering the Basics Tarps come in a variety of dimensions. An 8-by-10 foot tarp can provide full coverage for up…

Read More....

Got a bike? What about the right tires for your ride? Understanding the basics of tire sizing, tread selection, and a few other common features will help you choose wisely when it comes time to shop for replacement tires. Measure Twice Bike tire dimensions are indicated by two numbers, such as 26 x 2.0 or…

Read More....

Although a driver traveling from Washington, D.C., to Lubec, Maine, could make the journey in about 800 miles, the full expanse of coastline measures nearly 11,000 miles. For kayakers, all of those coves, harbors, and rivers hold opportunities for adventure. We asked Michael Daugherty, author of AMC’s Best Sea Kayaking in New England, and Michaela…

Read More....