Equipped

Not confident in how to winter camp? We’ve got you covered with these tips for setting up your tent in the snow and cold—and loving it. Vibrant. When picking a tent, go with a yellow or orange fabric over green or gray. Research shows cheerier colors are friendlier to your psyche if you’re tent-bound for…

Read More....

You can always anchor a tent by tying your guylines to a log or a rock buried in the snow (also called “deadmen”), but why not invest in a set of good snow stakes? For a secure hold at a minimal weight, consider the 0.5-ounce Olik Titanium Snow Stake from Suluk 46 ($90 for four;…

Read More....

Spending a night outside in winter requires a different shelter than in warmer seasons. To stay safe and comfortable when the wind howls and the snow piles up, you’ll want to choose a tent that’s as tough as the conditions. But what makes a tent truly winter-worthy? A reliable four-season tent is built to withstand…

Read More....

If you’re planning on backpacking with young kids, you really want them to enjoy the experience so they’ll keep coming back for more. After multiple trips taking my two young backpackers into the woods over the past two years (when they were between the ages of 4 and 8), here are a few key tips…

Read More....

Trick question. They’re the same thing. Last year, Dyneema acquired the Cubic Tech Corporation, the primary manufacturer of cuben fiber, and rebranded the material as Dyneema Composite Fabrics. So if you’re interested in shelling out for the very lightest weight fabric currently being used for outdoor gear—and have been confused by this name change on gear specs…

Read More....

With proper care, quality outdoor gear is built to last through years, even decades, of hard use and abuse. And yet all it takes is one neglectful or absent-minded moment to cause substantial damage to your equipment. Here are some of the most common fails and their accompanying fixes. MOLD AND MILDEW In the rush…

Read More....

I have, and continue to use, an original Jetboil PCS stove from the early 2000’s. It has proven to be durable, reliable, and useful in two very specialized ways: it boils water exceptionally fast and it’s great for making coffee. (Other than that, it’s pretty much useless—as far as I’m concerned, the pot is just too…

Read More....

Whether you’re hiking, climbing, biking, skiing, or just living in the modern world, you need a way to carry your supplies for the day. The concept is simple, and yet day packs come in multitudinous forms, with bewildering arrays of features to match. Here are the most important elements to consider. BIG DECISIONS Most day packs feature roughly 1,200 to 2,400 cubic inches of volume (or between 20 and…

Read More....

Some day-pack features are worth the money; others less so. Here’s what to look for and what to skip: Side straps are useful for lashing gear to the outside of your pack or for compressing an underfilled pack. Bungee systems also let you attach gear to your pack’s exterior, but these tend to be less secure and lose their stretch…

Read More....

There’s a general truism when it comes to ultralight tents. As manufacturers shave down the ounces, they often shave inches off the tent’s length. Which is fine if you’re less than 6 feet tall. But if you’re tall like me (6 feet 5 inches), there’s nothing fine about having your head and/or feet pushing directly against…

Read More....