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At AMC’s second meeting, in 1876, founders decided to extend membership to women and allow them equal participation in club outings and events. Despite being encumbered by modest dress, which included long, thick Victorian skirts, a large number of women quickly became active members in the club. In 1882, women made up the majority of…

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In 1908, Warren W. Hart, an indefatigable tramper, hiked down into the Great Gulf from Mount Jefferson. Hemmed in by the Northeast’s highest peaks, including Mounts Jefferson, Adams, Madison, and Washington, the Great Gulf had seldom been traversed and never logged prior to Hart’s journey. The remote wilderness and its rugged backdrop ignited Hart’s imagination…

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On June 17, 1896, three MIT students had bicycled from Boston to North Sandwich, N.H., to climb 4,043-foot Mount Passaconaway. Leaving from Birch Intervale, the former name for a section of the town of Tamworth, these men climbed the peak in less than three hours. They described the weather that day as “hazy, with occasional…

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In July 1919, AMC purchased Ledges Camp in North Chatham, N.H., and renamed it Cold River Camp. The property is located in Evans Notch, a rugged area of baldface mountains and ledges on the eastern fringe of the White Mountain National Forest, straddling the Maine and New Hampshire border. Offering no less in the way…

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Clyde Smith Sr., his wife Hilda, their son Clyde “Mickey” Smith Jr., and their dog Rex pose on top of Mount Cardigan, circa 1930s. Smith was warden of Cardigan’s fire tower for several years, spending summers on the mountain with his family. He later worked for the White Mountain National Forest and N.H. Trails Bureau…

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On land now protected from large-scale, industrial logging, AMC’s Little Lyford Pond Camps, in Greenville, Maine, were constructed circa 1874 as seasonal housing for loggers. Dozens of men would spend months at a time harvesting and floating saw logs down the West Branch of the Pleasant River. Like many nearby logging camps, Little Lyford eventually…

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Three skiers glide across an open slope in the White Mountains during the winter of 1927. AMC played a central role in the 1920s and 1930s in introducing New Englanders to the sport of skiing and became a significant catalyst to the formation and growth of the region’s alpine ski industry. In the 1920s, club…

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In 1922, AMC published the fifth edition of the White Mountain Guide, then titled Guide to Paths in the White Mountains and Adjacent Regions. A section called “Emergencies in the Woods” provided basic instruction and ink drawings on recognizing and treating hiking-related ailments. The authors noted, however, that “The following brief description does not pretend…

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A couple pauses on their hike to pose in the alpine zone on June 29, 1919. Mount Adams serves as their backdrop. AMC began documenting alpine plant species as early as 1900, when a list of plants collected in the Alpine Zone was published at a Field Meeting on the summit of Mount Washington. A…

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AMC member Dot McLaughlin ascends Katahdin’s Pamola Peak in this 1939 photo series. Climbing in the Northeast remained an all-male affair until the early 1800s, when women began making their way up the region’s high points. Recognizing the changing times would be a key factor in AMC’s early success. Indeed, women were among the club’s…

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