September/October 2018 Archives - Appalachian Mountain Club

September/October 2018

1. No-Pay Stays In its third year, the Peter Roderick Trail Award Scholarship was given to six AMC members, all first-time trail-work volunteers on AMC’s Maine Woods property. Established in 2016 by the Maine Chapter in honor of a longtime executive committee member, the scholarships cover the cost of food and lodging on volunteer trail-work…

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Anniversaries have been on a lot of minds at AMC all year. They come in thoughts that are hard to shake, bearing meanings that aren’t always easy to parse. On this page in the previous issue, I was excited to call out the White Mountain National Forest’s centennial celebration while looking ahead, to next spring…

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Whether you’re in your own backyard or in the backcountry, encountering an injured bird is enough to stop an outdoor lover in her tracks. But what’s the proper course of action to take—if any? We checked in with an expert on how to proceed. 1. DETERMINE IF IT’S A WINDOW-STRIKE  “The first thing you need…

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When picking out a headlamp that works for your outdoor needs, we recommended four key factors to consider: its primary use (trail or camp), brightness, beam distance, and battery life. But wait — there’s more! Here are some additional specifications—in rough priority order—to consider when choosing a headlamp.  Comfort. Wide elastic headbands are more comfortable and secure than…

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Tenkara fly fishing may be a niche market in the United States, but it sure is competitive. A New York angler casts his side of the tale. The first thing you should know about Tenkara Bum is that the “bum” part is a misnomer. Whether it’s 7 a.m. or 11 p.m., you’re likely to find…

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If you’ve ever noticed a swath of trees in an otherwise healthy forest flattened like matchsticks scattered by a giant, you were probably seeing the effects of a microburst or a macroburst. These downward explosions of cold air, which form during severe thunderstorms, leave noticeable changes in woodlands for years to come. “The trees will…

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Our son has always been a risk-taker. On a camping trip at 9 months old, he made a beeline for every campfire, trying to crawl right in and reach for the flames. Not yet 3, he ran full tilt into our pond, his legs churning forward even after his head was completely submerged.  My husband…

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As electric bicycles, or e-bikes, have grown in popularity, they’ve encountered pushback from a group that might surprise some: mountain biking enthusiasts. The potential for conflict arises, in part, from e-bikes’ impact on trails but also from mountain bikers’ concerns that their own diligence as good backcountry citizens could be undone by association.  E-bike advocates,…

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Poor Mount Monroe. Despite its stature as the fifth-highest mountain in New Hampshire, it doesn’t crack Instagram’s top 10 of the most-hashtagged 4,000-footers in the state. To conduct our pseudo-scientific popularity poll, we used the same convention for all 48 peaks: “mt” or “mtn” before or after the name, as listed in AMC’s White Mountain…

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Have you ever wondered who used a trail before you—or maybe how a trail first came to be? These eight routes were initially traveled by American Indians who created the paths for travel, trade, and spiritual connection long before European settlement. Pick one or several for the chance to walk in the footsteps of this…

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