Camp Cooking

  Winter can be a challenging season, even in ordinary times. Cold weather forces many people inside, making staying active more difficult. Inactivity and prolonged periods indoors comes with a whole host of issues, including higher levels of depression and more frequent illness. Concerns about COVID-19 spikes and continued separation from friends and family make…

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Historically, the campfire was a necessity for warmth and cooking, while today it’s become culturally synonymous with the outdoor experience. But the proliferation of lightweight and high-quality camp stoves, combined with deeper knowledge about the ecological impacts fires have on natural spaces and the environment, mean that fires are no longer a necessity in most…

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The following is an excerpt from AMC’s Real Trail Meals by Ethan and Sarah Hipple. Double Chocolate Granola Bars Makes: 12 bars Weight: 1.85 lbs. vegetarian, vegan, dairy-free, gluten-free, make at home Ingredients 1½ cups rolled oats 1 cup slivered almonds 2 cups pitted dates ¾ cup cocoa powder ¼ cup maple syrup ¼ cup…

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  Dr. Tom: How do I recognize and treat waterborne illness in the backcountry? Safe drinking water is a vital component of any successful outdoor trip for proper hydration. While it may be necessary at times, anyone who drinks surface water in the backcountry is at risk to develop a waterborne illness, regardless of how…

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Bears aren’t the only threat to your food in the backcountry. Mice, squirrels, and other small critters are also known to ransack camper food supplies, especially in and around trail shelters. To protect your food, you can hang it on one of the ubiquitous “mouse mobiles” that hang in shelters (typically a threaded can on…

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The asphalt service road that leads to Ecology Village, one of a handful of overnight camping spots in New York City, makes for smooth bicycling. When six young cyclists, all between the ages of 9 and 13, and their leader, Courtney Williams, pedal into the site on a sunny autumn Saturday morning, the vibe is…

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Hanging your food is a classic bearproofing technique, though it can be difficult to do correctly. Food must be suspended at least 10 feet off the ground and 4 feet from the trunk or nearest weight-bearing branch. To accomplish this, you’ll need 50 to 100 feet of cord and two stuff sacks for your food….

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If you’re out adventuring in cold weather, you need extra calories to feed the internal furnace of body heat production. To help  you meet this need—and find the most calories contained in a single energy bar wrapper—here are three high-calorie energy bars to add to the list I first put together back in 2010. First,…

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You know how, when you hear people talk about food, you get hungry? You start to salivate, maybe your stomach begins to growl, and your attention wanders from whatever you’re doing to your next fantasy meal. That’s exactly what happened to this magazine’s editorial team when we dug into the pages of Real Trail Meals,…

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Hold a fresh apple in one hand and a dehydrated version in the other, and you won’t need long to decide which you’d rather carry in your pack. Dehydrating your own food is a lightweight, inexpensive, and easy way to prepare a varied menu, from snacks to full meals, for your next backpacking trip. You…

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