Cookware and Dinnerware Archives - Appalachian Mountain Club

Cookware and Dinnerware

I have, and continue to use, an original Jetboil PCS stove from the early 2000’s. It has proven to be durable, reliable, and useful in two very specialized ways: it boils water exceptionally fast and it’s great for making coffee. (Other than that, it’s pretty much useless—as far as I’m concerned, the pot is just too…

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Add this to your list of camping hacks. Sure, there are a zillion different solutions for backcountry plates and bowls. You can choose from a massive selection made from plastic, titanium, stainless steel, or even collapsible silicone. Or perhaps you prefer a lightweight plastic food container. Or maybe you just eat straight out of the…

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Early 19th century hikers didn’t have much specialized gear. They wore cotton and wool and leather. But hiding in plain sight in many AMC photographs from the era is a trailblazing item: a tin AMC cup, often seen dangling from backpacks or hanging by their wire handles from belts. An ad in the back of…

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When it comes to camp cooking, there are some camp cookware items and accessories you need—and plenty you don’t. The Essentials Pot lifter (if your pots don’t have handles) Cup or other drinking vessel (potentially your pot or water bottle) Lightweight eating utensil (fork, spoon, spork, chopsticks) Small knife Very useful, not absolutely necessary Small…

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There’s ultralight backpacking, and then there’s hyperlight. It’s possible for all your backpacking gear to weigh less than 10 pounds (excluding food, water, and the clothes you’re wearing) but accomplishing it requires some notable sacrifices and expense. Here’s what it takes to experience the lightest, rightest, fastest backpacking experience of your life. Shelter: 0 to…

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