Helmets

Protecting your brain should seem like a no-brainer. According to the Federal Highway Administration, bike helmets are 85 to 88 percent effective at preventing head and brain injuries. But “helmets are very similar to seatbelts,” says Erik daSilva, the education and outreach coordinator for the Bicycle Coalition of Maine. A helmet won’t help you in…

Read More....

For $15 or less, the Schwinn Merge provides as much protection as helmets many times more expensive. Shortly after I wrote a recent column on bicycle helmets (Safety on the Brain: How to Choose a Bicycle Helmet), Consumer Reports released its latest study on this year’s crop of helmets (subscription required). The results are insightful—and…

Read More....

I like my brain. I would rather not damage it. So I wear a bicycle helmet to protect my skull and its useful contents while riding. Always. You never know when bad luck might send you hurtling head-first into the road, a car, or some other unyielding object. You probably like your brain too. So…

Read More....

I ride the 10-mile length of the Minuteman Bikeway most days to work, racking up hundreds of trips and thousands of miles over the past three years. And, as I detailed in a recent article (The Rail-Trail Effect), I’m far from the only one on bike path each day. Joggers, walkers, roller bladers, skateboarders, stroller…

Read More....

In more than 90 percent of bicycle fatalities, the rider was not wearing a helmet. Don’t become part of this statistic! Make sure your bike helmet fit is optimized to your noggin. It should feel snug but not uncomfortably tight and sit level on your head. The front should rest no more than one inch above…

Read More....