Naturalist/Nature Watching Archives - Appalachian Mountain Club

Naturalist/Nature Watching

Update: A coalition of environmental groups filed a lawsuit against the Department of the Interior and Fish and Wildlife Service on May 24, 2018, challenging a December 2017 memo that reinterpreted the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. This year marks the centennial of the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (MBTA). One of the nation’s oldest and most impactful…

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National forests are like the multitool of the public land system, open to a wide, if carefully monitored, array of uses: hiking, fishing, timber harvesting, and conservation among them. And then there’s forest bathing—the new trend of immersing yourself in nature as a remedy for the stress and anxiety of everyday life. Whether you dip…

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If you think fireflies’ flashes are simply random, pretty bursts of light, think again. “They’re not just putting on a fantastic light show for our enjoyment,” says Sara Lewis, a professor of biology at Tufts University and the author of Silent Sparks: The Wondrous World of Fireflies. “Those are the silent love songs of the…

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For centuries, artists have flocked to the White Mountains’ tranquil rivers, lofty summits, and craggy cliffs to create magnificent works of art. To continue the tradition, the U.S. Forest Service, in partnership with the Arts Alliance of Northern New Hampshire and Friends of Mead Base Conservation Center, has named White Mountain National Forest artists-in-residence every…

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Each year among the blooming flowers, chirping birds, and the melting snow, hikers visit their favorite trails to explore the beauty of springtime in New England. Don’t get us wrong, snowshoeing and skiing along the NET has its own charm, but we are excited to usher in the warmer weather and kick off the next…

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If your kids are like mine, they’re naturally observant and curious—which can make everything from a simple walk in the woods to a challenging mountain hike an opportunity for questions. Lots of questions. We polled AMC guides on the common queries they hear from kids on the trail. We’ll leave the answer to the most…

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  Now?” my nephew Kyle asks, sounding anxious. Peering into the water, I can just make out the pebble-strewn bottom down below. “Yep,” I reply. “Ready?” Without a word, he slips from his board and plunges into the clear, temperate Delaware River. Snorkel mask on, I follow him beneath the surface. And with that, we…

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It may not feel like beach weather to you, but piping plovers are already returning to their northern nesting grounds along the Atlantic coast. These tiny shorebirds usually reach southern New England by the end of March or early April and arrive in habitats farther south even sooner. In 1986, plovers were listed as threatened…

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Studying the movement of birds is challenging work. They’re fast, small, and can travel thousands of miles per year. Tracking devices are too large for many migratory species to carry, and that technology is also limited by cost, battery life, and antenna range. But movement biologists say their field is about to be revolutionized, thanks…

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Want to know if an upcoming storm will dump heavy, wet snow or soft powder perfect for skiing? You’ll probably need to check a meteorologist’s forecast. But to understand why the white stuff falls, and which atmospheric conditions create different kinds of snow, you can learn the basics yourself. Here’s a primer from Mike Carmon,…

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